Disclaimer :
This material can be used only for lecturing and teaching. Any other use must be approved by the owner of the material itself.

Free available courseware material

Here is an annotated list of freely available courseware material. It is the outcome of a survey made worldwide on the web.
By clicking on the active link "Slides" (where present) you open the set of slides related to the topic; by clicking on the URL you open the site related to the author of the slides, with possibly updated material.
For URL related to on-line books go to the site and read the copyright notice.

All the material can be categorized into 16 groups:

1. Probability and Statistics

2. Cryptology and Cryptography

3. Mathematical Logic

4. Dependable Systems

5. Distributed Systems

6. Software Reliability Engineering

7. Security

8. Privacy

9. HCI and Interactive Systems

10. General Topics

11. Testing, Verification and Validation

12. Real-Time Systems

13. Mathematical Programming and Operations Research

14. Graph Theory

15. Stochastic Network Optimization

16. Pattern Recognition Resources


1. Probability and Statistics:

Slides for ADVANCED PROBABILITY K. Trivedi

http://www.ee.duke.edu/~kst/

This set of slides is based on the well-known book Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 2001 by Kishor Trivedi of Duke University. This is the second edition of the book of the same author with the same title published with Prentice-Hall.
The book provides a comprehensive introduction to probability, statistics and stochastic processes, and leads the reader to a natural understanding of how these concepts and related methods can be applied in the modelling, analysis and quantitative evaluation of the performance and reliability of systems. The major merit of the book is that its pages contain, in the same readable language, classic material together with recent advancements and achievements distilled from the author’s research activity and experience in the area of the modelling and evaluation of stochastic systems.


2. Cryptology and Cryptography:

Slides for CRYPTOLOGY B. Preneel

http://homes.esat.kuleuven.be/~preneel/classes.html

This set of slides provides an overview of the state of the art in the design of cryptographic algorithms. It reviews the different type of algorithms for encryption and authentication. The principles are explained of stream ciphers, block ciphers, hash functions, public key encryption algorithms and digital signature schemes. Subsequently the design and evaluation procedures for cryptographic algorithms are discussed. The slides present also several exercises for the reader. The author requests a notification for using such material.


Book HANDBOOK OF CRYPTOGRAPHY A. Menezes, P. van Oorschot, S. Vanstone:

http://www.cacr.math.uwaterloo.ca/hac/

This site contains the downloadable book for personal use (courtesy of CRC, see copyright notice)


Slides for CRYPTOGRAPHY (in Italian) A. Marchetti Spaccamela

http://www.dis.uniroma1.it/%7Ealberto/didattica/critto.html

This set of slides is based on the book C Kaufman, R Perlman, M Speciner Network Security, private communication in a public world, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall, 2002. The slides present principle of Cryptography and their application to Network Security.


Slides for CRYPTOGHRAPHY AND SECURITY (some in German) M. Waldvogel

http://www.inf.uni-konstanz.de/disy/teaching/ss06/kryptographie/

In this site of Universitat Konstanz several presentations on Cryptography and Security can be found; they cover: Cryptographic checksums, Cryptoanalysis, WEP and WPA, VoIP Security, Why Cryptosystems fail, AES, Xbox Security and Trust and Reputation


Slides for CRYPTOGRAPHY E. Oswald, N. Smart

http://www.cs.bris.ac.uk/Teaching/Resources/COMS30124/

These slides contain an Introduction to Cryptography, taught at University of Bristol, UK.


Book CRYPTOGRAPHY, AN INTRODUCTION: SECOND EDITION N. Smart:

http://www.cs.bris.ac.uk/~nigel/Crypto_Book/

This site contains the downloadable book for personal use (see copyright notice)


Slides for CRYPTOGRAPHY M. Backes

http://www.infsec.cs.uni-sb.de/teaching/SS08/Cryptography

This site contains the slides by Michael Backes of Saarland University.

This course is an introduction to Modern Cryptography. It will introduce cryptography from scratch, i.e., no previous knowledge in cryptography or computer security is required. The list of topics comprises:

 • Information-theoretic security and the One-time Pad

 • Symmetric encryption, stream ciphers, block ciphers, Data Encryption Standard (DES), Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)

 • Asymmetric encryption, cryptosystems based on RSA and on the discrete logarithm problem, Cramer-Shoup encryption

 • Digital signature schemes

 • Cryptographic hash functions

 • Selected cryptographic protocols and their security

 • Crypto in the "real world"

 • Basic concepts of advanced cryptographic primitives and current research topics: Bit commitment, zero-knowledge proofs, simulatability, linking formal verification and cryptography


Slides for INFORMATION SECURITY D. Basin:

http://www.infsec.ethz.ch/education/ss08/infsec08

The course will survey the principles and methods of information security, along with the discussion of selected applications. This includes the following topics: Foundations of Cryptography, Key Management and Trust, Security Protocols, Access Control and Security Policies, Anonymity and Privacy
Access only through username and password


Slides for CRYPTOGRAPHY U. Maurer:

http://www.crypto.ethz.ch/teaching/lectures/Krypto06/

Access only through username and password


Slides for COMPUTER AND NETWORK SECURITY R. L. Rivest, S. Goldwasser:

http://courses.csail.mit.edu/6.857/2008/lecture.html

Access only through username and password


3. Mathematical Logic:

Book MATHEMATICAL LOGIC V. Detlovs & K. Podnieks:

http://www.ltn.lv/~podnieks/mlog/ml.htm

This is a hyper-textual book that contains all material on principle of mathematical logic, progressing from classical propositional and predicate logic to reach constructive propositional and predicate logic and Kripke semantics.


Book LOGIC IN COMPUTER SCIENCE M. Huth, M. Ryan:

http://www.ewidgetsonline.com/cup/widget.aspx?bookid=51/3mLE/ColK5qnmfcLSyg==&buyNowLink=http://sec.ebooks.com/cambridge-add.asp?I=283471&f=3

This site contains the online version of the book for personal use (see copyright notice)


Slides for LOGIC IN COMPUTER SCIENCE M. Huth, M. Ryan:

http://www.cs.bham.ac.uk/research/projects/lics/

It offers several materials, among them an interactive tutor for each chapter.
Many more places where courses are based on the book by Huth&Ryan are listed at :
http://www.cs.bham.ac.uk/research/projects/lics/adoptions.html


Slides for LOGIC IN COMPUTER SCIENCE T. Coquand:

http://www.cs.chalmers.se/Cs/Grundutb/Kurser/logcs/index.html

The slides present mainly a set of exercises in logic.


Slides for LOGIC IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Julia Lawall, N. Jones

http://www.diku.dk


Slides for LOGIC IN COMPUTER SCIENCE N. Adersen, J. Lawall

http://www.diku.dk/undervisning/2004f/202/

This course provides a sound basis in logic and an introduction to the logical frameworks used in modelling, specifying and verifying computer systems.
Propositional and predicate logic are detailed, as well as some specialized logics used for reasoning about the correctness of computer systems. A carefully chosen core of essential terminology is introduced; further technicalities are introduced only where they are required by the applications.
Numerous examples are given, as well as a full exposition of a fast-growing technique for modelling and verifying computer systems, known as symbolic model checking.


4. Dependable Systems:

Slides for PRINCIPLES OF DEPENDABLE SYSTEMS G. Candea

http://dslab.epfl.ch/courses/pods/winter06-07/index.html

This course offers advanced students a holistic view of the principles that underlie dependable software-centric computing systems, with an emphasis on large-scale distributed systems and Internet services. Lectures cover techniques for high availability, fault tolerance, monitoring, diagnosis; we look at how to achieve high availability through fast recovery and graceful service degradation, as well as techniques that leverage redundancy and replication. The utopia of flawless software will be discussed, as well as ways to cope with human operator errors, and metrics for evaluating dependability.


Slides for DEPENDABILITY OF COMPUTING SYSTEMS JC. Laprie

http://www.laas.fr/TSF/courses/N6K-ENAC_Global_2006.pdf

This set of slides of the master course offered at ENAC-ENSICA contains a full digest of the fundamentals of Dependability.


Slides for DEPENDABILITY AND SECURITY JC. Fabre

http://www.laas.fr/TSF/courses/SEC2007-slides.pdf

This set of slides offers a digest of the concepts of dependability and security and of their interrelationships.


5. Distributed Systems:

Slides for DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS (in Spanish) R. Jimenez-Peris

http://lsd.ls.fi.upm.es/lsd/education/sistemas-distribuidos-fundamentos-y-tecnologia-libre-eleccion-ingenieria-distributed-systems-master-level/

This set of slides covers aspects of distributed computing mainly dedicated to interactive consistency, agreement algorithms, transaction processing, replication as well as presenting several case studies.


Slides for DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS R. Baldoni

http://www.dis.uniroma1.it/%7Ebaldoni/SD.html

This set of slides covers the following topics: computational models, point-to-point communication channels, failure detectors, time and distributed algorithms, consensus, consistency and broadcast algorithms, software replication techniques, virtual synchrony.


Slides for DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM PLATFORMS R. Beraldi

http://www.dis.uniroma1.it/~beraldi/PSD0708/

This set of slides covers the following topics: communication in distributed systems, introduction to CORBA , CORBA IDL, introduction to objects, publisher/subscriber systems, Java RMI, ambient computing.


Slides for MIDDLEWARE SYSTEMS F. Panieri

http://courses.web.cs.unibo.it/SistemiMiddleware/MaterialeDiRiferimento

Access only through username and password


Slides for DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS N. Suri

http://www.deeds.informatik.tu-darmstadt.de/teaching/index.html

The site of TU Darmstadt contains many slides related to courses offered during the semesters of different years.


Book DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS P. Verissimo & L. Rodrigues:

http://www.navigators.di.fc.ul.pt/dssa/

This link points to the book that the authors use for their teaching and contains indirect pointers to interesting sites.


Slides for DISTRIBUTED FAULT-TOLERANT ALGORITHMS R. Guerraoui

http://www.di.fc.ul.pt/~ler/irdp/teaching.htm

This set of slides is mainly dedicated to extensive analysis of reliable, causal and total order broadcasts, as well as consensus and group membership and shared memory.


Slides for DISTRIBUTED FAULT-TOLERANT AND SECURE ALGORITHMS C. Cachin

http://www.zurich.ibm.com/~cca/sft06/

These slides contain the lectures taken at ETH Zurich on Security and Fault-Tolerance in Distributed Systems.


Slides for DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS G. Couloris, J. Dollimore, T. Kindberg:

http://www.dcs.qmw.ac.uk/research/distrib/dsbook/

This site is based on the book Distribute Systems: Concept and Design, Addison-Wesley, 1994 by G. Couloris, J. Dollimore, T. Kindberg. The interesting thing is that the Instructors Guide, in addition to slides related to the book, includes a line of use of the material (Presentation points) that discuss the objectives of section, the points to emphasize, the possible difficulties and the teaching hints.


6. Software Reliability Engineering:

Slides for SOFTWARE RELIABILITY ENGINEERING J. Musa

http://openseminar.org/se/courses/41/modules/206/index/screen.do

Reliability is the probability that a system functions correctly, in a given environment over a given amount of time. Some aspects of reliability are availability, correctness, safety, operational usability, etc. Software reliability engineering is the study of operational profiles to determine the best areas to test by estimating the components that will be used the most by the customer and testing those components first.

There are several phases of software reliability engineering. The first is to define the product by looking at the customers, users, external suppliers, and certifying external software. The second step is to implement the operational profiles, which involves looking at system components and determining the probability of their use. Third, the failure intensity object is determined. Fourth, the test cases are created that fit the operation profile and are within the bounds of the failure intensity object. Lastly, reliability data is tracked so that future estimates will be more accurate.

The set of slides and presentations covers all topics listed earlier.


Book HANDBOOK OF SOFTWARE RELIABILITY ENGINEERING M. Lyu:

http://www.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/~lyu/book/reliability/index.html

This site contains the downloadable book for personal use (see copyright notice)


7. Security:

Slides for SECURITY L. Williams & S. Smith

http://openseminar.org/se/modules/44/index/screen.do

Software security is important, especially in distributed systems, to protect the integrity of the information stored and used by a software system. Questions about security requirements should be asked of the customers during requirements solicitation. The best practice for providing a secure system to customers is to ensure that security concerns are provided for upfront, and during all phases of development. Adding security features to an application, after development of the main functionality is complete, is difficult.

The set of slides and presentations covers all topics listed earlier.


Slides for SECURITY AND FAULT TOLERANCE C. Cachin

http://www.zurich.ibm.com/~cca/sft06/

http://www.zurich.ibm.com/~cca/sft08/

According to Lamport, a distributed system is one where the crash of a computer that you've never heard of stops you from getting any work done. This course presents methods for building dependable and secure distributed systems. The emphasis is on fault-tolerant and distributed cryptographic protocols. Topics include group communication, failure detectors, reliable broadcast protocols, distributed cryptography, threshold cryptosystems, Byzantine agreement, quorum systems, and replication. Applications to cluster computing, Internet services, and storage systems are also presented.

The course introduces principles and fundamental methods, and shows how they are applied to real-world systems.


Book DEFENCE IN DEPTH: FOUNDATIONS FOR SECURE AND RESILIENT IT ENTERPRISES C.J. May, J. Hammerstein, J. Mattson, K. Rush:

http://www.sei.cmu.edu/pub/documents/06.reports/pdf/06hb003.pdf

This site contains the downloadable book for personal use (see copyright notice)


Book SECURITY ENGINEERING R. Anderson:

http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/book.html

This site contains the downloadable book for personal use (see copyright notice)


Slides for DEPENDABILITY AND SECURITY JC. Fabre

http://www.laas.fr/TSF/courses/SEC2007-slides.pdf

This set of slides offers a digest of the concepts of dependability and security and of their interrelationships.


Slides for SECURITY in WIRELESS NETWORKS L. Buttyan, J.P. Hubaux

http://secowinet.epfl.ch/index.php?page=slideshow.html

This set of slides is derived by the book of the same authors Security and Cooperation in Wireless Networks, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 9780521873710. Please note copyright notice.


8. Privacy:

Slides for PRIVACY L. Williams & S. Smith

http://openseminar.org/se/modules/45/index/screen.do

Privacy concerns can arise due to security problems or questions about why certain information is gathered by a website or application. Privacy issues for users of all levels must also be addressed as early in development as the requirements phase, with an emphasis on whom has access to certain information and what will be done with the information. A system should be created that only stores the minimal amount of personal information about a person required to complete a given function.

The set of slides and presentations covers all topics listed earlier.


9. HCI and Interactive Systems:

Slides for HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION (in French) P. Palanque

http://resist.ecs.soton.ac.uk/wiki/images/1/10/designrationale.pdf

http://liihs.irit.fr/palanque/Ps/MasterHM-IntroHCIPalanque.pdf

Learn how to systematically consider various options while analyzing, designing and implementing interactive systems. Learn the underlying concepts of rationalizing and structuring argumentation during the various phases of the development process of interactive systems. Learn how to organize models and designs in order to provide traceability of the analysis, design and implementation choices.


Slides for INTERACTIVE SYSTEMS (in French) P. Palanque

http://resist.ecs.soton.ac.uk/wiki/images/b/b9/interactivesystemsengineering.pdf

Learn the specificities of the development of interactive Systems. These specificities are explained with respect to the development process, the notation and the implementation. Basic introduction to Visual Basic 6.0 is given as it proves to be a very efficient tool for high fidelity prototyping of standard interactive systems.


Slides for HUMAN-MACHINE INTERACTION ACM SIG on HCI:

http://sigchi.org/cdg/index.html

These slides gather a large set of lectures on HCI and Human factors mainly in the US. This set of courses have been gathered and organised by the ACM Special Interest Group on HCI.


Slides for HUMAN INTERFACES and USABILITY U. Texas at San Antonio:

http://vip.cs.utsa.edu/classes/cs6693s2006/lectures/index.html

The slides contain a set of lectures held at UTSA.


Slides for HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION A. Dix, J. Finlay, G. Abowd, R. Beale

http://www.hcibook.com/e3/resources/

This site contains the slides related to the content of the book Human-Computer Interaction, Prentice-Hall, 2004 by Alan Dix, Janet Finlay. Gregory Abowd and Russell Beale


Slides for PERVASIVE HUMAN CENTRIC COMPUTING MIT OpenCourseware:

http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Electrical-Engineering-and-Computer-Science/6-883Spring-2006/CourseHome/index.htm

This course is broad, covering a wide range of topics that have to do with the post-pc era of computing. It is a hands-on project course that also includes some foundational subjects. Students will program iPAQ handheld computers, cell phones (series 60 phones), speech processing, vision, Cricket location systems, GPS, and more. Most of the programming will be using Python®, but Python® can be learned and mastered during the course. This course features a partial set of lecture notes and a list of readings. In addition, sample quiz questions are available in the exams section.


Book FAILURE IN SAFETY-CRITICAL SYSTEMS: A HANDBOOK OF ACCIDENT AND INCIDENT REPORTING C. Johnson:

http://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~johnson/book/

This site contains the downloadable book for personal use (see copyright notice)


10. General Topics:

From the Computer Science Teaching Centre:

http://csta.villanova.edu/CITIDEL/

CITIDEL, the Computing and Information Technology Interactive Digital Educational Library, now accesses over 480,000 entries. CSTC is one of CITIDEL's source collections. CITIDEL is the computing educational portal to the NSDL, the National Science Digital Library. It contains a huge repository of reviewed teaching material on all aspects of Computer Science, including topics related to resilient computing. It may be searched by alphabetical listing, by titles, by authors, by subjects, and by date.


Videos from UC Berkeley:

http://video.google.com/ucberkeley.html

This site contains a set of videos of University of Berkeley. They cover many aspects of Science and Humanities. Of interest for this report what is presented at: http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=owner%3Aucberkeley+is141&page=1&so=1 on Information Systems.


11. Testing, Verification and Validation:

Slides for COMPUTER-AIDED VERIFICATION R. Alur

http://www.cis.upenn.edu/cis673/

The course introduces the theory and practice of formal methods for the design and analysis of concurrent and embedded systems. The emphasis is on the underlying logical and automata-theoretic concepts, the algorithmic solutions, and heuristics to cope with the high computational complexity. Topics include:
- Models and semantics of reactive systems: states vs. events, nondeterminism vs. concurrency, synchrony vs. asynchrony, safety vs. liveness, refinement preorders, real-time and hybrid systems, open systems.
- Verification algorithms: temporal logic model checking, theory of omega automata, games, minimization.
- Verification techniques: symbolic model checking, on-the-fly model checking, state space reduction methods, compositional and hierarchical reasoning, abstraction and refinement.


Book COMPUTER-AIDED VERIFICATION R. Alur, T.A. Henzinger:

http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~alur/CIS673/index.html

This site contains the downloadable book for personal use (see copyright notice)


Slides on Topics on VERIFICATION A. Pnueli

http://www.wisdom.weizmann.ac.il/~amir/

This course concentrates on methods for the verification of reactive systems. The course starts by reviewing the basic models and algorithmic processes for model checking of reactive systems.
Next, the course extends the models and verification techniques to handle infinite-state systems, using the techniques of deductive verification.


Slides for DEDUCTIVE VERIFICATION OF REACTIVE SYSTEMS A. Pnueli:

http://www.wisdom.weizmann.ac.il/~amir/Course02a/header.html

This course will present methods for the deductive verification of reactive systems, i.e. proving that reactive systems satisfy their specification, given by Temporal Logic formulas, using deductive (i.e. theorem proving) methods.
Unlike model checking, deductive verification is not restricted to finite-state systems and can handle unrestricted programs with rich data-structures. On the other hand, these techniques are not fully automatic and require user interaction and ingenuity in the design of auxiliary constructs such as invariants and ranking functions and, at a later stage, the effective guidance of a theorem-proving tool.


Slides for TEST AND VERIFICATION E. Fleury et al.

http://www.cs.auc.dk/~kgl/TOV04/Plan.html

The focus of this course is on techniques and software-tools that can be used to assess the quality and correctness of software systems. The first part of the course considers tools and techniques for formal verification of system designs. The last part of the course considers tools and techniques for testing system implementations.


Book CAUSAL SYSTEM ANALYSIS P. Ladkin:

http://www.rvs.uni-bielefeld.de/publications/books/ComputerSafetyBook/index.html

This site contains the downloadable book for personal use (see copyright notice)


Book CONCEPTS, ALGORITHMS, AND TOOLS FOR MODEL CHECKING J-P. Katoen:

http://www.cs.aau.dk/~kgl/VERIFICATION99/katoen2.ps

This site contains the downloadable book for personal use (see copyright notice)


Slides for VALIDATION AND VERIFICATION J. P. Bowen

http://www.cs.ucl.ac.uk/staff/J.Bowen/GS03/

The course will train students in the principles and techniques of validating and verifying complex software systems. The training will be at an intellectually demanding level and will cover not only the state-of-the practice in validation and verification, but also the most significant trends, problems and results in validation and verification research.

These slides concentrate mainly on testing aspects and on formal methods aspects.


Slides for THEOREM PROVING AND MODEL CHECKING IN PVS E. Clarke, D Kroening

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~emc/15-820A/

This course will cover a number of techniques that have proven to be useful in verifying software and hardware systems including Temporal Logic, Model Checking, BDDs, Fast SAT Procedures, and Theorem Proving. The focus of the course will be on the PVS Theorem Prover / Model Checker developed at SRI (and widely regarded as the most powerful tool in its class). Students will learn how to use PVS for hardware and software verification. Some of the basic decision procedures used in PVS for theorem proving and model checking will be presented. The course will conclude with a discussion of the limitations of PVS for software and hardware verification and how a tool might be constructed that would be more powerful.


Slides for SYSTEM VALIDATION T. C. Ruys

http://fmt.cs.utwente.nl/courses/systemvalidation/

The complexity of software and hardware systems is rapidly increasing and so is their vulnerability with respect to errors. The course System Validation is focused on validation techniques and methods to assess the correctness and dependability of information- and communication technology (ICT) systems.
The emphasis is on model checking, an automated and very successful validation technique. Close attention will be paid to the model checker SPIN. The central theme of this course is model-checking algorithms for the automated analysis of concurrent software. Besides the basic algorithmic principles, considerable attention will be devoted to optimization techniques that make model checking a verification approach of industrial relevance. Finally, algorithms and software tools will be treated that are aimed at the verification of Java and C++ programs.


Slides for ABSTRACT INTERPRETATION P Cousot, J. C. Hunsaker

http://web.mit.edu/afs/athena.mit.edu/course/16/16.399/www

Abstract Interpretation is a theory of approximation of mathematical structures, in particular those involved in the semantic models of computer systems. Abstract interpretation can be applied to the systematic construction of methods and effective algorithms to approximate undecidable or very complex problems in computer science such that the semantics, the proof, the static analysis, the verification, the safety and the security of software or hardware computer systems. In particular, abstract interpretation-based static analysis, which automatically infers dynamic properties of computer systems, has been very successful these last years to automatically verify complex properties of real-time, safety critical, embedded systems.

The course is an introduction to abstract interpretation with application to static analysis (the automatic, compile-time determination of run-time properties of programs) and software verification (conformance to a specification).


Slides for ABSTRACT INTERPRETATION David Schmidt

http://santos.cis.ksu.edu/schmidt/Escuela03/home.html

A static analysis finitely analyzes a program in advance of the program's execution and extracts information useful for program transformation or program-correctness proofs. Abstract interpretation is a foundational framework that can justify the correctness of a static analysis. Many elegant static analyses are synthesized from the abstract interpretations that justify their correctness. This series of lectures introduces abstract interpretation and applies it to static analysis. Standard formats of static analysis are presented, and abstract interpretations are used to synthesize both abstract-operational- and abstract-denotational-semantics definitions and as well as logics and models for temporal-logic model checking.


Slides for SOFTWARE TESTING P. Ammann, J. Offutt

http://cs.gmu.edu/~offutt/softwaretest/powerpoint/

Concepts and techniques for testing software and assuring its quality. Topics cover software testing at the unit, module, subsystem, and system levels, automatic and manual techniques for generating and validating test data, the testing process, static vs. dynamic analysis, functional testing, inspections, and reliability assessment.
The course makes it explicit that all test approaches fundamentally rely on four categories of models to be covered: graphs, logical expressions, input domain characterization and syntactic structures.


12. Real-Time Systems:

Slides for OPERATING SYSTEMS CONCEPTS Avi Silberschatz, Peter Baer Galvin, Greg Gagne

http://www.os-book.com/

This set of slides covers the full topic of Operating Systems with a large part dedocated to Real-time systems.


Slides for REAL-TIME SYSTEMS (in Italian) G. Buttazzo

http://feanor.sssup.it/~giorgio/srt.html

This set of lectures introduces the topic of real-time systems and of the problems related to scheduling algorithms.


Slides for REAL-TIME SYSTEMS (in French) I. Puaut

http://www.irisa.fr/caps/people/puaut/puaut.html

These slides contains a generic course on real-time.


13. Mathematical Programming and Operations Research:

Slides for INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING T. Ralphs

http://www.lehigh.edu/~tkr2/teaching/ie406/

This courseware from Ted Ralphs of Lehigh University offers a comprehensive material for optimization problems.


Slides for OPERATIONS RESEARCH from tutOR U. Melbourne:

http://www.tutor.ms.unimelb.edu.au/frame.html

This site contains a collection of web-based, online tutorial modules.


14. Graph Theory:

Book GRAPH ALGORITHMS S. Even:

http://www.wisdom.weizmann.ac.il/~oded/even-alg.html

This site contains downloadable excerpts of the book for personal use (see copyright notice)


15. Stochastic Network Optimization M.J. Neely:

http://www-rcf.usc.edu/~mjneely/stochastic/

The page links to papers in the area, and is intended as a resource for researchers and practitioners.


16. Pattern Recognition Resources B. Fisher:

http://homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/rbf/IAPR/

This web site contains links to resources that can support students, researchers and staff. The most important resources are for students, researchers and educators.
These include lists with URLs to: